a free symposium presented by the
American Energy Innovation Council

AEIC's mission is to foster strong economic growth, create jobs in new industries, and reestablish America’s energy technology leadership through robust public and private investments in the development of world-changing energy technologies.


SESSIONS
MAKING PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS MORE PRODUCTIVE

What is the role of public-private partnerships in American energy innovation? How can partnerships increase the rate of bringing energy technology discovery and invention to market? How can they better drive follow-on investments? What are recent examples of success? How or why do failures occur?


IMPROVING INDUCEMENTS FOR ENERGY INNOVATION

What is the role of incentives and standards in inducing energy innovation investments? How do we (re)design our tax code to optimize energy innovation? To what extent can performance standards induce energy innovation? How do we avoid inappropriate market distortions?


UNLOCKING INVESTMENT THROUGH PUBLIC AUTHORITIES

Where are gaps in financing energy innovation? Why and how can the public sector cost-effectively address gaps in the financing supply chain? What role can public agencies play in unlocking private capital and lowering the cost of that capital? What are recent examples of success? How or why do failures occur?


ENABLING GOVERNMENT AS CUSTOMER FOR INNOVATION

How can the government as a customer drive resources into energy innovation? What makes the government well-suited as a customer for energy innovation? What are recent examples of success? How do we address the disconnect between short-term budgeting and longer-term payoffs?




SPEAKERS INCLUDE

EVENT INFO

WHEN
July 23, 2014
8:30 AM - 3:00 PM

WHERE
Renaissance Ballroom
Renaissance Downtown Hotel
999 Ninth Street NW
Washington DC 20001

This event is free to attend and open to the public and media.

This event has been organized to meet the requirements for a widely attended event as set forth in the Congressional ethics rules. If you have any questions, please contact Jason Burwen.

Register to attend

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The world’s energy sources have to be clean, as well as reliable and affordable. That’s why we need a massive amount of innovation in research and development on clean energy: new ways to stabilize the intermittent flows from wind and solar; cheaper, more efficient solar panels; better equipment for transmitting and managing energy; next-generation nuclear plants that are even safer than today’s; and more.

PRIOR WORK

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  • THE BUSINESS PLAN
    2010 Council Report

    We are convinced that America has a great deal to gain from smart, ambitious investments in clean energy innovation. As business leaders, we know how the private sector can be mobilized to attack these problems, but we also know the government must step up to protect the public interest. We set forth here the necessary actions that the public sector must take to unlock the ingenuity and capital of the American marketplace in pursuit of the nation’s clean energy goals.

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  • CATALYZING INGENUITY
    2011 Council Report

    Building on our previous report, this update highlights the need for an active government role in energy innovation, recommends ways to improve the effectiveness of government innovation programs, and highlights options to pay for energy innovation investments.

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  • UNLEASHING PRIVATE SECTOR ENERGY R&D
    2013 Staff Paper

    We interviewed top R&D executives at some of the largest and most innovative companies in America. Their insights shed light on how to integrate research and development into a successful business model. They also reveal how government and business can work together to accelerate innovation and solve America’s energy challenges.

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  • CASE: UNCONVENTIONAL GAS TECHNOLOGY
    2013 Staff Paper

    While the private sector has driven the continuous improvements and breakthroughs in exploration and production technologies for unconventional natural gas, unconventional gas production through these combined techniques became commonplace only in the 1990s after years of federal support and further innovations. The federal government substantively aided private efforts in several ways: basic science and resource mapping; coordinating and complementing industry efforts; applied research and development; and tax credits for unconventional gas.

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  • CASE: AERODERIVATIVE TURIBNES
    2013 Staff Paper

    The development of aeroderivative gas turbines is inseparable from the development of aircraft engines, which was led by the military and bolstered by the rise of commercial aviation. Industry-government partnerships to advance aircraft engine technology have driven the evolution of aeroderivative gas turbines through several mechanisms: competitive military procurement, military R&D management, technology testing and validation, and public-private partnerships.

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  • CASE: ADVANCED DIESEL ENGINES
    2013 Staff Paper

    Following the 1973 oil embargo, the government placed a new emphasis on technological development to improve fuel efficiency and reduce dependence on foreign oil. Over the following decades, there were three main mechanisms by which the government supported the improvement of diesel engines: performing basic combustion research, creating engine simulation tools, and establishing research partnerships.

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  • CASE: LOW-EMISSIVTY WINDOWS
    2013 Staff Paper

    Since the 1970s, the government has used four primary mechanisms to drive low‑e window technology development and commercialization: basic research and seed investments; computer tools for simulating window performance; standardized testing procedures and performance ratings; and educational outreach to manufacturers and consumers.

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  • CASE: VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY PARTNERSHIPS
    2014 Staff Paper

    This case study examines the light-duty vehicle technology and hydrogen fuel cell programs of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), paying particular attention to the broad collaborative R&D partnerships between the federal government and U.S. automakers and fuel providers through the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (1993-2002), the FreedomCAR and Fuels partnership (2002-2011), and the U.S. DRIVE partnership (2011-present). The paper describes the origins and nature of US vehicle technology programs, tracks the evolution of vehicle technology R&D partnerships, and concludes with a discussion of the efficacy and worthiness of such partnerships.


IN PARTNERSHIP
  • BPC

    The American Energy Innovation Council is a project of the Bipartisan Policy Center.