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State by State Use of CARES Act Supplemental CCDBG Funds

The Brief

The CARES Act provided states with supplemental funding for child care, through the Child Care and Development Block grant, to help address needs of working families and providers through COVID-19. States were given broad flexibility for how to use this funding and have therefore taken a variety of approaches. This blog summarizes how the majority of states are using, or plan to use, their supplemental CCDBG funds through the coronavirus.

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Alaska

Alaska received an additional $6.4 million in Child Care and Development Block Grant funds in the CARES Act.

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Massachusetts

Massachusetts received $45.7 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act. The state has temporarily closed all non-emergency child care programs through June 29.

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Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania received $106.4 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act.

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Virginia

Virginia received $70.8 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act.

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Wyoming

Wyoming received $4.1 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act and as of May 1, had committed $3.6 million.

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Wisconsin

Wisconsin received $51.6 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act.

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Montana

Montana received $10.1 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act and anticipates this funding will last through June.

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South Dakota

South Dakota received $9 million in supplemental funding for CCDBG through the CARES Act. South Dakota did not order all child care programs to close, and allowed each provider to make the determination on their own.

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Minnesota

Minnesota received $48.1 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act. Over 4,000 family and center-based child care providers are continuing to offer care for emergency and essential workers during the crisis.

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Alabama

Alabama received $65 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act. Alabama is using funds to offer “sustainability payments” to providers that remain open and participate in the state’s subsidy program.

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Washington

Washington received $58.6 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act and plans to fully obligate this funding by the end of June.

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North Dakota

North Dakota received $6 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through CARES Act. The state is using funds to offer emergency operating grants to any licensed provider.

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Florida

Florida received $223.6 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act.

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Missouri

Missouri received $66.5 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act and has fully obligated funding through a CARES Act Child Care Plan as part of the state’s Show Me Strong Recovery.

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Iowa

Iowa received $32 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act.

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New Hampshire

New Hampshire received $7 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through CARES Act. The state is spending their CARES funds, and additional state and philanthropic funds, on several ways to keep the child care programs afloat.

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District Of Columbia

The District of Columbia has activated a Child Care Disaster Response plan in response to COVID-19.

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Vermont

Vermont received $4.4 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act.

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New Hampshire

New Hampshire received $7 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through CARES Act.

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Arkansas

Arkansas received $41.5 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act.

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Texas

Texas received $371.6 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act. The state has responded to child care needs during COVID-19 by developing a new online child care portal.

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Mississippi

Mississippi received $47 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act. In response to COVID-19, the state created a Childcare Crisis Assistance in Isolation Response, or CCAIR Plan, to guide providers and parents through child care during the pandemic.

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Rhode Island

Rhode Island received $8 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through CARES Act. The state mandated all child care providers, including family providers, to close through June 1, and has also suspended all licenses during this time.

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New Jersey

New Jersey received $63 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act.

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New Mexico

New Mexico received $29.4 million in CCDBG funding through the CARES Act. In New Mexico, child care remains open to serve essential employees.

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Ohio

Ohio received $117 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through CARES Act.

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Arizona

Arizona received $88 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act.

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Colorado

Colorado received $42.5 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act.

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Connecticut

Connecticut received an additional $23.5 million for CCDBG through the CARES Act.

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Delaware

Delaware received $9.7 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act. Child care programs in Delaware are essential, but may only continue operating as an emergency child care provider under a designated “Emergency Child Care Site” as determined by the state

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New Jersey

New Jersey received $63 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through CARES Act.

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West Virginia

West Virginia received $23.16 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act.

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Colorado

Colorado received $42.5 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act.

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Minnesota

Minnesota received $48.1 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act.

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Wisconsin

Wisconsin received $51.6 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act.

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Georgia

Georgia received $144.5 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act.

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Idaho

Child Care has been deemed an essential service in Idaho.

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Illinois

The state received $118.4 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act and state officials.

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Indiana

Indiana received an additional $78.8 million for CCDBG in the CARES Act.

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Kansas

Through the CARES Act, Kansas received an additional $30.77 million in CCDBG funds.

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Kentucky

The state received $67.7 million in supplemental funding through the CARES Act.

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Louisiana

Supplemental CCDBG CARES Act funds for Louisiana totaled $67.6 million.

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Maine

Maine received $10.9 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act.

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Maryland

Maryland considers child care as an essential service and has obligated 100% of their CCDBG funding provided in the CARES Act.

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Massachusetts

Massachusetts received an additional $45.7 million in CCDBG funding through the CARES Act.

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Michigan

Michigan received $100.1 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act and announced it will be adding $30 million of CCDBG funding to create a Child Care Relief Fund.

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Montana

Montana received $10.1 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act.

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Nevada

Child care has been deemed essential in Nevada, but over 70% of programs are closed. The state received $32.9 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act.

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New York

Child care has been deemed essential in New York. New York received $118 million in supplemental CARES Act funding.

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North Carolina

Child care in North Carolina is an essential service. North Carolina received $118 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act.

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Oklahoma

The Oklahoma Department of Human Services announced it will use its $50 million in supplemental funds from the CARES Act to establish a program to help families receive child care as they seek employment.

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Oregon

Oregon received $38.6 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act.

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Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania received $106.4 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act.

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South Carolina

As part of the state’s supplemental $63.7 million in CARES Act funding for CCDBG, South Carolina is offering child care assistance for parents who have been deemed essential and are still working during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Tennessee

Tennessee received an additional $82.4 million in supplemental CCDBG funds in the CARES Act.

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Utah

Utah received $40.4 million in additional CCDBG funding through the CARES Act.

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Virginia

Through the CARES Act, Virginia received $70.8 million in supplemental CCDBG funding.

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Washington

The state received $58.6 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act and plans to fully obligate this funding by the end of June.

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Wyoming

Wyoming received $4.1 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act.

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Alaska

Alaska received an additional $6.4 million in Child Care and Development Block Grant funds in the CARES Act. The Alaska Child Care Program Office will use this funding to offer capacity-building payments for March, April, and May, to child care providers who are closed due to COVID-19. The payment amounts will be based on February enrollment of both private-pay and subsidy recipient families and are available to all providers, regardless of their participation in the state’s subsidy program. The goal of these grants is to support program’s ability to retains staff, purchase necessary supplies, change operations to accommodate essential staff, pay utilities and rent, and other necessary costs to remain operational or be able to reopen.

The state anticipates this program to last through June 2020 unless other funds become available.

Additional Information

 

Massachusetts

Massachusetts received $45.7 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act. The state has temporarily closed all non-emergency child care programs through June 29. Programs authorized to operate as emergency child care programs are the only programs allowed to remain open, under the intent to provide services for vulnerable children and children of working parents who have been identified as essential. It is estimated that around 500 of the over 8,000 providers have remained open through the Exempt Emergency Child Care Program allowance.

A survey of parents in Massachusetts found that about half believe they will not be able to return to work without a consistent child care program to rely on. Further, nearly 90% said they will hesitate to send their children to a formal arrangement due to health concerns and a striking 30% of parents said they will not return to their previous care arrangement even if they are able to.

Programs remaining open are able to receive small, flat rate grants to help defray the cost of operations. Specifically, centers can receive $2,500 per classroom, per week, for up to 2 classrooms and a maximum of $5,000 per center each week. Home-based providers can receive $1,000 each week for up to 8 children. The state anticipates this funding will be available through the end of June.

Funding for emergency child care programs is not designed to cover the entire cost of operating but rather to ease the fiscal burden on programs that have stepped forward to provide assistance to families during the crisis. The state is also continuing to pay all subsidies and parent copayments to providers who are closed, for the duration of the public health emergency. The state is also prioritizing testing for COVID-19 among child care workers.

Additional Information

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania received $106.4 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act. The state has allocated about half ($51 million) of their CARES Act funds to support all eligible child care providers across the state—nearly 7,000 in total—to ensure they can reopen once the state and other businesses begin doing so.

Funding awards range based on type of provider (family homes, group homes, centers, and those serving only school aged children), size (based on licensed capacity), and location (distribution varies by county). On average, funding awards will range from $2,235 for family child care homes to up to $20,700 for the largest child care centers. All providers will receive a base payment, and providers can receive additional funding if they serve an area that lacks capacity compared to the projections of children that need care.

The remaining CARES Act funding will be allocated following the completion of a study conducted by the state in coordination with Penn State Harrisburg’s Institute of State and Regional Affairs assessing the economic impact of the pandemic on child care providers across the state. The state will survey a sample of 1,000 randomly selected, representative sample of providers across the state, and will seek to answer the financial costs providers have absorbed (or have been unable to absorb); how many programs will remain operational and how many might not; what level of investments are needed to cover costs that would allow providers to remain operational; and, what level of support is needed to ensure programs can remain operational during a transition period of low demand because of unemployment and fears about the virus’s reemergence.

Child care centers were mandated to close across the state, but may seek an emergency waiver if they wish to remain open and serve essential service worker families. Home-based child care programs–family child care home program and group child care home programs in Pennsylvania–were not included in mandated closures and can remain open without an emergency waiver. Pennsylvania has continued to pay child care subsidy reimbursements based on enrollment at the time of a program’s closure.

Additional Information

Virginia

Virginia received $70.8 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act. The state plans to use their all their CARES Act funds to provide incentive grants to child care providers who remain open and serve children of front-line and essential workers through June. Across Virginia, in April, the state estimated approximately 2,700 child care centers—or nearly 45 percent—closed, including nearly 40 percent of providers that serve children through Virginia’s subsidy program. Combined with family child care homes and other child care sites, these closures represent a reduction in capacity of at least 200,000 slots.

Virginia obligated all of it’s CARES Act funding for the specific purposes:

  • Provide incentive grants to child care providers that are open, available through the end of June;
  • Eliminate co-payments through June for low-income, working families who receive federal child care subsidy dollars;
  • Prepare schools to act as emergency child care centers, where needed; and
  • Provide additional funding for child care providers that participate in the federal subsidy program, but have had to close. This will help ensure they are ready to welcome children back as soon as this crisis has passed.

Additional Information

Wyoming

Wyoming received $4.1 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act and as of May 1, had committed $3.6 million. Additionally, the Wyoming Department of Workforce Services identified $2.5 million from other funding sources to support child care throughout the state. The state has identified child care as a “critical part of the infrastructure of Wyoming, allowing essential systems to function” and therefore, beginning May 1, child care providers may reopen under alternate health and safety recommendations, such as smaller group sizes and screening procedures.

Programs that are open must prioritize child care for children of essential personnel and register as an Emergency Child Care Facility. The state has created a portal for essential parents who need child care, with all providers serving essential personnel with capacity updated daily. Wyoming also created a website for providers to find substitute workers.

Before instituting a plan for CARES Act funding, Wyoming conducted a survey of over 200 child care programs and other organizations serving youth throughout the state to understand the needs of those businesses and organizations. Two-thirds of respondents reported they were unable to access funding under the CARES Act for other business supports, outside of CCDBG. When asked what supports or resources were needed to keep programs in business and allow them to reopen when the time comes, nearly half said they would need funding for tuition replacement and 45% said they would need program stabilization funding for their business to meet basic costs.

Wyoming will use CARES Act funds to offer a one-time stipend for all licensed providers to support operations and for continuing subsidy payments to providers for all enrolled children. The state legislature is meeting in May to approve additional allocations and determine additional policies to support children, families, and providers.

Additional Information

Wisconsin

Wisconsin received $51.6 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act. The state is primarily using funds to provide child care for essential workers, and support providers through emergency payments (detailed below). Prior to allocating funds, the state, in partnership with the Wisconsin Hospitals Association, surveyed health providers to identify the demand for child care among the healthcare workforce. The state also surveyed the early childhood workforce to identify those who would be willing to continue providing child care in-home, and to assist staffing new emergency child care centers. Providers that remain open are instructed to prioritize essential workforce families through May 26.

The state has used their CARES Act funding to implement a COVID-19 Emergency Payment Program, “Child Care Counts,” to support child care providers in weathering this crisis. The state estimates that, due to declined enrollment and safety concerns, 40% of providers temporarily closed. As such, several funding opportunities exist:

  1. Support for essential worker families who need access to child care, which can be used for paying staff, reimbursing families, or other allowable expenses;
  2. Incentive pay for child care providers and teachers during the state of emergency who remain open and working, in order to care for children of essential workers; and
  3. Support for child care programs that have closed, intended to support the costs of retaining staff and reopening programs once Wisconsin’s workforce can return to normal operations. These funds are required to be used for reopening within 30 days of receiving such funding, and must be used on specific activities such as paying staff, reimbursing families, mortgage and rent, utilities, materials for supplies or cleaning, and others.

Additional Information

Montana

Montana received $10.1 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act and anticipates this funding will last through June. The state is using funds to offer financial support for child care programs; support temporary emergency child care; and cover enhanced payment rates for all subsidy recipients. Montana anticipates that by combining the emergency grant funds, plus the continued reimbursement subsidy slots, plus the potential use of other non-profit and/or small business supports, child care providers should be able to cover program expenses during the emergency.

Specifically, providers may apply for Emergency Grants—one-time payments of $3,000 for family programs; $5,000 for group homes; and, up to $8,000 for centers. Any licensed or registered child care program is eligible to apply, if they are currently operating or plan to reopen, and if they have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Further, the state is offering Temporary Emergency Child Care Support grants to non-licensed programs to cover the costs of care for essential, medical, and emergency personnel. This funding is available for the sole purpose of offering care to such families during the period of emergency, and is not intended to act as start-up grants for new child care providers or to provide temporary or new funding streams to existing youth development, school-age or afterschool programs, or summer programs. The state anticipates awarding 20 one-time grants: up to $23,000 for a program serving under 10 children each day; up to $55,000 for programs serving between 11-24 children each day; and, up to $90,000 for programs serving more than 24 children each day.

Additionally, for providers that have remained open, the state plans to pay providers for enrollment, rather than attendance, and cover all parent copayments from March through May. For those that have temporarily closed, but plan to reopen, the state will offer a backpay of three months.

Additional Information

South Dakota

South Dakota received $9 million in supplemental funding for CCDBG through the CARES Act. South Dakota did not order all child care programs to close, and allowed each provider to make the determination on their own. The state recommends all programs remaining open adhere to CDC guidance.

South Dakota’s Division of Child Care Services considers COVID-19 as a “special circumstance” and therefore, programs can have additional children in care until schools are open: no more than two additional children for family homes, no more than three additional children for group homes, and no more than 20 percent of the licensed capacity for centers. Any additional children are to be included in staff-to-child ratio requirements. The state is asking child care providers to be flexible with staff who are ill or caring for sick family members and recommends contingency planning for staff shortages in order to meet staff-to-child ratios. It is also asking providers to work with parents to identify children with special health conditions that place them at higher risk and take appropriate precautions. The state has also recommended avoiding mixed age classrooms, staggering transition times, limiting visitors, and adhering to other health and safety guidelines to reduce the spread of the virus. The state has also said they plan to support child care programs that need additional financing to remain open or reopen, as well as to support child care for essential workers.

Additional Information

Minnesota

Minnesota received $48.1 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act. Over 4,000 family and center-based child care providers are continuing to offer care for emergency and essential workers during the crisis. The state is using $30 million of their funds to support a Peacetime Emergency Childcare Grant program for licensed providers who are offering child care to children of emergency responders. Grants are offered on a monthly basis beginning at $4,500, with additional $1,000 available for programs providing non-traditional hours care, care for children whose first language is not English, and/or who have special needs. Providers that are licensed to serve 15 or more children will be eligible for an additional amount of up to $15,500 per month. Minnesota is also continuing to provide subsidy payments for children who are absent at open facilities, and to providers who have temporarily closed, for up to one month.

Approximately $9.75 million was allocated in the first month of the grant, between April 18 through May 18. Rounds two and three will occur in subsequent months. The state received 5,401 applications or nearly 60% of all eligible providers. Of these, 84% were home-based or family care providers, and 16% were from centers. The state awarded grants to just 1,287 applicants, or about a quarter of those programs that applied.

The state has also encouraged school districts and charter schools to provide care to school-aged children during the day to children of emergency workers, as well as to stay open during the summer months to respond to workforce needs. Local Emergency Operation Centers are offering child care providers cleaning products and supplies.

Additional Information

Alabama

Alabama received $65 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act. Alabama is using funds to offer “sustainability payments” to providers that remain open and participate in the state’s subsidy program. These weekly payments are intended to help make up for lost income due to lower capacity levels as required by the state’s health orders. Providers will receive payments that represent 50% of children enrolled in a program. Additionally, providers that remain open will continue to receive subsidy payments based on attendance, including for school-aged children. No payments for absences will be provided, which is a change in policy from March, when providers would receive payments for children who were absent for more than 5 days.

Providers that are closed may also receive the sustainability payments to assist with regular, ongoing operating expenses, and to help offset costs associated with reopening but will not receive subsidy reimbursements.

Beginning in May, parents who work in the healthcare industry are able to receive child care assistance, regardless of their income levels. Participants must select a licensed child care provider, including centers or family homes. The program will last through the public health emergency, and all participants will be given a 20-day notice prior to the program’s expiration.

Alabama published separate orders for Early Head Start-Child Care Partnership grantee participants. Providers participating in this program are required to close through May 29, 2020 with a tentative reopening of June 1. During the closures, child care programs will continue to be paid their full rate per child, based on the number of contracted slots. Teachers and family care assistants will continue to be paid, even if they are unable to work. Programs that wish to remain open to provide child care during the emergency may do so as long as they are in compliance with all state and local guidance and standards, and are not required to meet EHS-CCP standards.

Additional Information

Washington

Washington received $58.6 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act and plans to fully obligate this funding by the end of June. In Washington, child care businesses and workers are deemed essential and exempt from the “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” order and therefore not required to close. However, data from the state shows over 25% of providers temporarily closed representing 35% of licensed capacity in Washington.

Washington used funds to create a Child Care COVID-19 Grant Program to support providers that remain open. These one-time funds will be based on licensed capacity of three stages (under 50 children; 50-99 children; above 100 children). Small providers will be given $6,500, medium-sized providers will receive $11,500, and larger providers will receive $14,000. These grants may be used to support ongoing rent or mortgage payments, salaries of personnel, utilities, health and safety supplies and cleaning, or for purchasing food. All licensed providers that remain open will be able to apply for these grants in mid-May.

The state is also using funds to waive family copayments for April, May, and June. Licensed providers are temporarily allowed to claim subsidy payments based on enrollment rather than attendance from March 16 through June 30, regardless of if the provider has temporarily closed or is still open.

Additional Information

North Dakota

North Dakota received $6 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through CARES Act. The state is using funds to offer emergency operating grants to any licensed provider, intended to help cover some of the extra costs of modified operating practices and to help sustain the child care industry through this period of disruption. Providers that remain open are eligible to receive grants, and recipients must agree to prioritize children of essential workers. Providers are also required to cap the fees they would typically charge families to hold a spot during extended absences at $50 each month. The state has asked all providers to consider offering care during extended, expanded, and alternative hours. Providers that have temporarily closed are not eligible to receive emergency grants. Payments will be based on facility type and licensed capacity.

The state also added flexibility to allow school districts to help care for children in grades K-5 whose parents work in vital health, safety and lifeline services, under modified operating approaches.

Additional Information

Florida

Florida received $223.6 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act. While Florida child care providers may remain operational, over 50% have temporarily closed. The Florida Department of Education’s Office of Early Learning has created a Child Care Application and Authorization Form specifically for frontline workers who need child care during this time. For these individuals, child care will be offered for a free or reduced rate for three months, April through June, at which point the continued need for child care will be reevaluated. In most cases, providers may still charge parents fees, but the state will cover copayments through at least the end of May.

Florida has used CARES Act funds to authorize a bonus system that provides additional funding to child care providers that have remained open to care for children of first responders and health care personnel. In addition to regular reimbursement rates, participating child care providers will receive a $500 bonus per child, with a maximum monthly bonus of $4,000, and a maximum $12,000 bonus for the 90-day duration of the program.

For providers that have remained open, the state is paying for all unanticipated absences due to parents keeping their children at home, beginning on March 1 without additional documentation required. Providers that have temporarily closed will also continue to be reimbursed based on enrollment and must submit additional documentation in the form of a questionnaire in order to receive such funding. These payments are both for the state’s child care subsidy as well as the state’s voluntary preschool program. Florida has also created a streamlined process for coalitions to purchase supplies on behalf of providers, such as cleaning and protective items. The state has extended training and testing requirements for child care staff, including competency exams, through September 2020. Because local colleges are closed, these classes may be offered online.

Additional Information

Missouri

Missouri received $66.5 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act and has fully obligated funding through a CARES Act Child Care Plan as part of the state’s Show Me Strong Recovery.

From May 1 through August 31, parents who are working, attending school, or a training program, with an income above the state’s current subsidy eligibility (138% of the federal poverty level, or $30,000 for a family of three) and up to 215% of the federal poverty level (or about $45,000 for a family of three) may qualify for a Transitional Child Care Subsidy, helping pay for their child care needs. Families who receive these benefits will receive between 60% to 80% of the usual subsidy benefit depending on their income. This temporary assistance is estimated to cost almost $13 million.

Additionally, parents who are unemployed due to COVID-19 can receive a temporary child care benefit, for up to 90 days, while they search for work. This benefit is available through December 2020 and is estimated to cost $14.4 million. For parents who are first responders, health care workers, and other essential personnel, the state has established a hotline and email address as a resource to assist in their search for child care. For parents who were already receiving a state subsidy, all benefits are automatically extend for 90 days. The state will work on a case-by-case basis to approve additional hours of care for impacted families.

For providers that remain open serving children of essential personnel can receive a one-time bonus payment based on that provider’s capacity, ranging between $1,000 for smaller providers (under 10 children) and up to $7,500 (over 200 children served). The state anticipates this will cost $3.5 million per month. Additionally, providers operating during non-traditional hours (7:00pm to 6:00am, or on the weekend) can receive a $100 monthly stipend for each child care slot offered for the months of April, May, and June, for a total cost of $4.2 million. All providers will receive subsidy payments based on enrollment rather than actual attendance for the same months, anticipated to cost almost $20 million.

Missouri has allocated $10 million in one-time competitive grants to institutions of higher education to establish on-campus child care programs. The state will work with institutions of higher education and the state’s workforce develo​pment boards to assess the needs of the state’s workers, and will require programs to reserve some space for children receiving state subsidies.

Additional Information

Iowa

Iowa received $32 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act. The state has developed a COVID-19 Childcare Sustainability Plan for obligating it’s supplemental funds. Within the span of one month–March 1 through March 31–the state reports 76% of programs temporarily closed. The vast majority of those (87%) plan to reopen, but the 13% of those who said they would not represent a harsh reality for the future of child care in Iowa.

The state is providing a monthly stipend of $2,000 to all licensed centers that remain open, and $500 to all registered homes that remain open. To encourage providers to serve essential services personnel, the state will double this stipend to providers if they offer a 25% tuition discount to such workers, for a potential total of $4,000 to centers and $1,000 to homes. These payments will be available from May through July and expected to cost about $20 million.

For providers serving families receiving subsidies, the state will pay full tuition amounts including any copays, which are waived for families at a cost of $2 million. The state continues to pay full-day, full-attendance rates to providers for all school-aged children enrolled. Iowa has provided hand sanitizer and other cleaning supplies directly to providers and is covering the cost of background checks for temporary emergency site employees.

For programs that have closed, the state will offer “Rejuvenation Grants” in the form of one-time payments available from April through June. These are intended to help providers come back into the market by addressing loss of revenue while closed and for cleaning, replacing equipment or materials, and acquiring necessary supplies. Licensed centers are eligible for $1,500 and licensed centers are eligible for $600 through these grants, which will cost the state $6 million from their CARES Act funds.

Additional Information

New Hampshire

New Hampshire received $7 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through CARES Act. The state is spending their CARES funds, and additional state and philanthropic funds, on several ways to keep the child care programs afloat. First, the state is prioritizing care for children whose parents are essential workers, as well as children with special needs and those at risk for abuse and neglect.

The state has allocated $4 million for costs associated with operationalizing an Emergency Child Care System, including covering payments for subsidy families, extended absences, and program closures. Child Care Aware of New Hampshire, funded by the state, created an emergency child care response telephone line and website to determine current and future capacity of child care professionals to provide emergency child care services and match child care needs of employers and parents. The state has also started distributing cleaning supplies to all the open child care providers including boxes containing soap, bleach, masks and toilet paper.

As of May 1, 243 child care centers had been designated participants in the program, with another 62 ready to take on more children as more businesses reopen. This exceeds the state’s initial estimates that 150 providers would sign up. About 5,000 children are going to child care programs, and there are about 1,500 more spots available, according to the state. However, this is a small number compared to the state’s pre-pandemic child care use: there were some 46,000 slots in February, according to early childhood education advocacy group Early Childhood NH.

Almost half of the state’s child care workers have filed for unemployment, according to the Department of Education and the state Office of Economic Relief and Recovery. The presentation noted that unemployment, with the additional $600 weekly benefit enacted as part of the CARES Act federal stimulus, pays more than a child care worker’s typical wage.

Additional Information

District Of Columbia

The District of Columbia has activated a Child Care Disaster Response plan in response to COVID-19. The district strongly encourages that child care centers follow guidelines on the operating status of public schools, which remain closed. Because of this, the district will continue subsidy payments and will offer reimbursements based on enrollment rather than attendance. All parents receiving child care subsidy assistance will have their copays waived during the public health emergency. Families who have their 12 month eligibility expire during the public health emergency will remain eligible for subsidized child care until the District government resumes in-person operations.

For health care workers and essential government employees and contractors, the district has partnered with several licensed providers to create emergency child care sites. Emergency child care is offered from 6 am to 8 pm, Monday through Friday, at six sites. The sites follow recent federal and District of Columbia Government health and safety guidance related to group size limits, cleaning protocols and screenings before children and staff enter a facility. Health care professionals who currently receive a child care voucher will continue to have their child care costs covered and will not be charged a copay. Given the urgent need for care, the district is helping to alleviate part of the cost of care for families who do not typically qualify for child care assistance. Out-of-pocket costs for these families vary depending on the provider and age of the child.

The district announced all licensing inspections will be postponed until the end of the public health emergency. This includes initial, unannounced monitoring, annual, renewal, validation visits and follow up inspections. Processing of criminal background checks will continue without interruption.

Additional Information

Vermont

Vermont received $4.4 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act. The state has implemented a series of measures to support programs providing child care to essential personnel, and a tuition support program to allow programs to pay their staff during the closure period. Emergency child care is prioritized for children whose parents or guardians are health care system employees, first responders, and essential government employees who are responsible for the execution of the COVID-19 response. Programs operating as emergency child care will receive an additional $125 each week in supplemental pay (on top of tuition) per child served in emergency care. Programs that are closed, if they commit to fully paying all staff and to asking families to pay half of their usual tuition (or usual copay, if they receive subsidy), will receive full tuition payment for each enrolled child. A family that chooses to not pay the 50% to their provider can unenroll their child and the state will cover the full cost of the usual tuition, up to $360 each week, until the provider has filled the slot. The intent around paying 50% of tuition is to help ensure programs will remain stable and can reopen when stay at home orders are eventually lifted. The state notes that unemployment insurance doesn’t cover ongoing expenses such as mortgages or lease payments, utilities, or other fixed costs. Families who cannot pay, or who have seen a change in income due to work disruptions can apply for the state’s subsidy program.

On April 27, the secretary of the Vermont Agency of Human Services, which oversees child care in the state, announced during a press conference that child care programs will likely be allowed to reopen to non-essential workers sometime in June.

Additional Information

New Hampshire

New Hampshire received $7 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through CARES Act. The state is spending their CARES funds, and additional state and philanthropic funds, on several efforts to keep child care programs afloat and to prioritize care for children whose parents are essential workers, as well as children with special needs and those at risk for abuse and neglect.

The state has allocated over $7 million for costs associated with operationalizing an Emergency Child Care System, including covering payments for subsidy families, extended absences, and program closures. Of that, some money has gone to creating a $5 hourly incentive payment to keep child care workers working and off the state’s unemployment system. As of May 1, around half of the state’s child care workers had filed for unemployment, according to state officials. These officials noted that the additional $600 weekly temporary unemployment benefit enacted as part of the CARES Act pays more than a child care worker’s typical wages.

Child Care Aware of New Hampshire, funded by the state, has created an emergency child care response telephone line and website to determine current and future capacity of child care professionals to provide emergency child care services and match employers and parents. The state has also started distributing cleaning supplies to all the open child care providers including boxes containing soap, bleach, masks and toilet paper.

As of May 1, 243 child care centers had been designated participants in the program, with another 62 ready to take on more children as more businesses reopen. This exceeds the state’s initial estimates that 150 providers would sign up. About 5,000 children are going to child care programs each week, and there are about 1,500 more spots available. However, this is a small number compared to the state’s pre-pandemic child care use: there were some 46,000 slots in February.

Additional Information

Arkansas

Arkansas received $41.5 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act. The state will use CARES funds to increase the subsidy reimbursement rates for child care providers remaining open for children of frontline workers. Specifically, through May 31, and for each child receiving a federal subsidy through the state, providers will receive an additional $10 per infant/toddler, $7 per preschool aged child, and $5 per each school-age/out of school time care. The state is suspending the renewal process for families, so that all parents who receive a subsidy can continue doing so through the pandemic.

In addition to using CCDBG funds through the CARES Act to support child care, Arkansas will tap Community Development Block Grant funds to support small businesses, including child care providers, through bridge loans.

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Texas

Texas received $371.6 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act. The state has responded to child care needs during COVID-19 by developing a new online child care portal specifically to help frontline employees locate child care and apply for subsidies, and to guide child care providers who have stayed in operation. The state is prioritizing care for children of healthcare and pharmacy workers, first responders, critical infrastructure workers, and child care staff who are still working to support others. Income eligibility has been expanded to 150% of the state median income, or about $99,000 annually for a three-person household. Parents who qualify for the frontline subsidy will not pay a copayment or fees to access child care. For parents who are not eligible for assistance, providers may continue to collect tuition.

Licensed providers that stay open must complete an Emergency Notification Survey and consider operational changes including ages served, hours of operations, capacity, and ratio requirements. The state does not set reimbursement rates for child care subsidy: across the state, 28 local Workforce Development Boards set reimbursement rates based on the type of program (center, home, etc.), age of children, and quality rating. These boards are responsible for developing planning and oversight responsibilities for workforce programs and services in their area, including the child care subsidy program.

For providers who are not licensed, Texas created a Temporary Emergency Child Care Operation permit valid for 60 days, and renewable, or at least through the extent of the disaster. Each TECCO must only provide child care to essential workers or for children receiving protective services, and comply with health and safety standards.

Additional Information

Mississippi

Mississippi received $47 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act. In response to COVID-19, the state created a Childcare Crisis Assistance in Isolation Response, or CCAIR Plan, to guide providers and parents through child care during the pandemic. The plan establishes CCAIR child care sites, a temporary designation for locations that remain open to provide emergency child care to families whose work is considered essential by the state. Any existing child care provider can be a CCAIR provider, but in order to serve children with emergency subsidy certificates (detailed below), programs must complete CCAIR orientation training, provided online free of charge.

Parents who meet the definition of a priority population will be able to receive an emergency subsidy certificate, without consideration of family income during the declared disaster. These emergency certificates will cover the full cost of care and parents need not pay any copayment to their preferred provider. Additionally, parents already receiving child care subsidies who have lost their job or do not meet the school or work hour requirements due to COVID-19 will remain eligible for the subsidy program. However, parents are required to continue seeking employment and/or school enrollment. If the crisis extends beyond three months, and a parent still has not found employment, the state will extend eligibility for 60 days.

The state will pay providers based on enrollment, rather than attendance, through May, as long as the enrolled child has attended at least one day during the first month of the declared emergency. Additionally, the full subsidy will be paid to providers, including any parent copayments through May. This will continue as long as funds are available. State officials also conducted a webinar for child care providers about financial support available to them outside of the state subsidy program, including the Paycheck Protection Program and expanded unemployment insurance.

Additional Information

Rhode Island

Rhode Island received $8 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through CARES Act. The state mandated all child care providers, including family providers, to close through June 1, and has also suspended all licenses during this time. To help parents who still need child care, the state is partnering with Care.com. All parents–not just those identified as essential–still in need of child care can use the website for free, for 90 days. Rhode Island is also encouraging residents interested in becoming caregivers to register on the website.

The state’s Department of Human Services is supporting providers during this time by continuing subsidy payments until June 1, including reimbursing providers based on enrollment, not attendance; covering the cost of family copayments in provider payments; and, waiving the absence policy for families receiving subsidies.

Prior to the planned reopening of the state’s businesses on June 1, all child care providers must develop and submit a “COVID-19 Plan” to the state’s child care licensing body. This plan serves as an application process for providers to reopen; the state must approve such plans prior to programs reopening. These plans must address new health regulations, such as reduced group sizes, screening procedures, and movement between classrooms; enhanced training; and new payment practices. These new payment practices will be in effect from June 1 through August 28, and include subsidy payments based on enrollment rather than attendance for those providers who reopen, as well as a temporary rate enhancement to support reopening costs. For providers who do not reopen, reimbursements will no longer be provided.

Additional Information

New Jersey

New Jersey received $63 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act. The state directed the closure of all child care centers except for those on federal property or military bases, family-based centers caring for five or fewer children, and any centers that register to exclusively provide emergency child care services to essential personnel. Nearly 600 child care providers statewide have been certified to provide emergency child care services. The state is using CARES funds to support child care costs for essential workers, through an Emergency Child Care Assistance Program. Essential employees with young children wishing to participate must register online, at which point the county-based Child Care Research and Referral agency will reach out to assist to enrollment and placement. The state will pay uniform rates to each provider, depending on age of child enrolled, through April. The state notes that if additional federal assistance is available, more may be done.

Additionally, New Jersey continues to pay all providers based on enrollment for March, April, and May, regardless of the program has closed as a precaution or remains open. Providers remaining open will also receive a $100 stipend per child, on top of their regular subsidy rate. Additional assistance may be available to subsidy-recipients who have had their hours reduced or laid off, or with school-aged children who might require additional hours of care, to help with copayments.

Additional Information

New Mexico

New Mexico received $29.4 million in CCDBG funding through the CARES Act. In New Mexico, child care remains open to serve essential employees. The state has decided to spend their funding on several activities to both support essential workers—including child care staff—and to stabilize the child care market for the long run. Almost half of their funds will be allocated through Recovery and Stabilization grants, distributed in May, to help support the ongoing operations of child care programs. The state anticipates nearly 1,000 providers would receive these grants which will range from $2,000 to $34,000 depending on the setting, size, quality level, and number of children receiving subsidy. Another 27% of CARES funding will support providers that remain open by offering an incentive of $250 per child. While child care homes are not eligible for grants, they are eligible for the incentive payments.

To support child care staff who are still working amidst the crisis, New Mexico is spending 27% of their CARES funds on incentive pay for the months of April through June. Full time staff are eligible for $700 each month, while part-time staff are eligible for $350 each month. The state also continues to pay providers for all contracts if the provider has temporarily closed, has waived copays for families, has purchased and delivered personal protective equipment, and is expediting the background check process. Lastly, New Mexico has established a Family, Friend, and Neighbor program to provide emergency care.

Additional Information

Ohio

Ohio received $117 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through CARES Act. The state is using funds for a Temporary Pandemic Child Care Program, a short-term license for child care providers to stay open for parents working on the frontlines of the crisis. Providers—both centers and homes—that remain open are asked to prioritize medical professionals. The state keeps a list of approved providers, searchable on the Department of Jobs and Family Services website. Child care workers employed in pandemic programs are also considered essential, and may send their children to such temporary programs. Payments to providers occur on a weekly basis and are set determined on the provider’s quality rating, the number and ages of enrolled children. Additionally, programs may not charge families copayments or fees through the remainder of the crisis.

Additional Information

Arizona

Arizona received $88 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act. The state is using funds to fully cover costs of child care for frontline workers through newly established Arizona Enrichment Centers. Licensed providers wishing to stay open must register to become an enrichment center, and upon approval, will be reimbursed for the full cost of care for children served. Providers may not charge families additional copays or fees beyond what is provided by the state, as the reimbursement is intended to cover all costs of care during this time. Those participating in this program must take temperatures of all children, staff, and volunteers, and all staff must have completed background checks. Priority for space will be given based on where parents live and, for health care workers, in close proximity to hospitals. Providers participating in the program can request supplies such as baby wipes, sanitizer, cleaning products, paper products, and water or snacks, on a weekly basis.

Additional Information

Colorado

Colorado received $42.5 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act. The state identified child care as a critical service and therefore, programs can continue operating under emergency status. Colorado established an Emergency Child Care Collaborative to ensure that essential workers have access to child care. Through the emergency program, the state covers 100% of child care tuition for essential workers through May 17, and providers may not charge families any additional fees or copays beyond what is provided by the collaborative. The emergency program is a public-private partnership, funded through both CCDBG funding and philanthropic resources. Additionally, the state’s Family Resource Centers are distributing essential supplies including formula, diapers and wipes, and others.

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Connecticut

Connecticut received an additional $23.5 million for CCDBG through the CARES Act. Child Care has been identified as an essential service in the state. Connecticut is using their CARES Act funding to provide additional resources to licensed child care providers, both centers and family child care providers, that have stayed open to serve children of essential workers. Specifically, additional reimbursements will be made to licensed programs that are caring for children of essential workers during the crisis. Programs that have closed are eligible once they reopen. The state intends this will help offset the higher costs many child care providers are experiencing while they adhere to strict new public health standards, such as lower ratios, and operate with decreased enrollment. Programs are also asked to document how they will use this funding to increase wages for staff during the crisis.

Connecticut intends to offer the financial assistance through May and may extend it depending on how much funding is available.

Separately, Connecticut has established “CTCARES”, an emergency child care program across the state to serve hospital and other healthcare workers as they continue to work on the frontlines of the crisis. The state is working in partnership with major hospitals to determine the needs of hospital employees and is identifying programs that might be able to serve these parents, based on proximity to hospital, current space available, and licensing status.

Additional Information

Delaware

Delaware received $9.7 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act. Child care programs in Delaware are essential, but may only continue operating as an emergency child care provider under a designated “Emergency Child Care Site” as determined by the state. Thus, not all programs licensed by the state prior to the crisis are open. Those programs that do remain open should prioritize children of essential workers an effort to assist those critical personnel during the crisis. Providers who remain open can apply for enhanced reimbursements from the state that will help cover increased operating costs.

As the state begins reopening on June 1, child care programs must still be designated as child care sites in order to reopen. The state has also said child care should only be used when absolutely necessary to work. Parents must certify that they work for an essential or reopened business, and cannot work from home, in order to participate in the Emergency Child Care Program. The state has established an online map where parents can search for nearby programs that are operating under the emergency designation. The state has said they are paying programs based on the following:

  • For those who remain open as an emergency site, fully covering the cost of children served, and reimbursing providers for vacant slots based on their capacity for children.
  • Offering “Enhanced Reimbursements” for Emergency Childcare Sites, which may be used for additional staff pay, sanitation, or meeting additional state health requirements. Such enhanced reimbursements shall be determined by vacant slots at Emergency Childcare Sites. These payments are available for the duration of the state’s response to COVID-19 or until further notice is provided.
  • Additional adjustments may be made for essential staff pay and for tiered reimbursements for child care programs that are temporarily closed, but still paying their staff.

Additional Information

New Jersey

New Jersey received $63 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through CARES Act. The state has executed a waiver to allow for flexible operating standards for child care facilities, as well as permitting schools to remain open to provide child care services in emergency situations for essential workers. Any provider remaining open will operate as an Emergency Child Care Center, through a commitment to provide care exclusively to children of essential personnel during the time that public schools are closed. Both licensed and licensed-exempt providers may participate. Family child care providers do not fall under the order to close, and can continue operating under their previous circumstances.

New Jersey is also using funds to launch an Emergency Child Care Assistance Program to cover child care costs for essential workers, regardless of their income. Under this program, parents may be responsible for differences in state payment rates and provider tuition rates, although providers are prohibited from raising rates beyond 10%. For parents currently receiving subsidy, the state is covering all costs of the program and waiving all parent copayments or additional fees. Each of these policies will last through May, at which point the state will revisit the situation and any available federal resources.

West Virginia

West Virginia received $23.16 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act. The state is providing child care assistance for any parent who has been deemed an essential worker, and will provide funding directly to providers at an enhanced rate for the duration of the crisis or as funding remains. Nearly 700 child care providers have registered with the state as a “critical child care site” to remain operational to help with essential personnel.

As West Virginia residents begin to return to work, Governor Jim Justice (R) announced guidelines for child care programs considering reopening, including a requirement that all child care staff be tested for COVID-19. The state will cover all costs for providers and employees to receive testing, and those without insurance will not face charges or copays. The West Virginia National Guard has been instructed to assist with testing if needed. Providers must also submit a checklist to the state about their intent to reopen under new health and safety preparedness, including identifying plans to cover staff absences, measures to prevent the spread of the illness, implementing social distancing and smaller ratios, and other areas of importance.

Colorado

Colorado received $42.5 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act. The state identified child care as a critical service and therefore, programs can continue operating under emergency status. Colorado established an Emergency Child Care Collaborative to ensure that essential workers have access to child care. Through the emergency program, the state covers 100% of child care tuition for essential workers through May 17, and providers may not charge families any additional fees or copays beyond what is provided by the collaborative. The emergency program is a public-private partnership, funded through both CCDBG funding and philanthropic resources. Additionally, the state’s Family Resource Centers are distributing essential supplies including formula, diapers and wipes, and others.

Looking ahead, into the reopening phase, the state plans to reform subsidy payments to cover reduced ratios and groups sizes, support flexibility for staff due to anticipated absences, and health costs from screenings to preventative measures. The state also anticipates an increase to social and emotional behavior supports, and will help to identify additional support services and consultations for families. Colorado has also raised questions about how to reopen stronger, building capacity to support alternative care models including family child care networks and shared services programs. The state also identifies a need to consider new cost modeling under these new economic and societal realities, including cost-based reimbursements rather than market rate calculations.

Minnesota

Minnesota received $48.1 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act. Over 4,000 family and center-based child care providers are continuing to offer care for emergency and essential workers during the crisis. The state is using $30 million of their funds to support a Peacetime Emergency Childcare Grant program for licensed providers who are offering child care to children of emergency responders. Grants are offered on a monthly basis beginning at $4,500, with additional $1,000 available for programs providing non-traditional hours care, care for children whose first language is not English, and/or who have special needs. Providers that are licensed to serve 15 or more children will be eligible for an additional amount of up to $15,500 per month. Minnesota is also continuing to provide subsidy payments for children who are absent at open facilities, and to providers who have temporarily closed, for up to one month.

The state has also encouraged school districts and charter schools to provide care to school-aged children during the day to children of emergency workers. Local Emergency Operation Centers are offering child care providers cleaning products and supplies.

Wisconsin

Wisconsin received $51.6 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act. The state is primarily using funds to provide child care for essential workers, and is seeking approval from the legislature to provide grants directly to child care providers. The state, in partnership with the Wisconsin Hospitals Association, surveyed health providers to identify how many staff needed child care, and conducted a survey of providers to identify which remained open to serve these workers. The state also surveyed the early childhood workforce to identify those who would be willing to continue providing child care in-home, and to assist staffing new emergency child care centers. Wisconsin has allowed child care providers to open as emergency child care providers, and will allow additional providers to reopen once the demand for child care increases. Providers that remain open are instructed to prioritize essential workforce families through May 26.

Wisconsin must obtain approval from the Joint Committee on Finance in order to provide CARES Act funding directly to child care providers. The Wisconsin Department of Children and Families will provide funding opportunities once they receive approval.

The state is continuing to pay providers during this emergency, and the continuity of funds is intended to provide compensation and benefits to staff, and to support the infrastructure so programs are able to reopen. The funding is reevaluated on a monthly basis.

Georgia

Georgia received $144.5 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act. While the state has allowed child care to remain open, approximately 1,700 of the nearly 4,500 licensed child care programs remain open to serve first responders. As such, the state is continuing to provide subsidy payments to child care providers who have temporarily closed. Georgia established a new priority for receipt of child care subsidy assistance, including essential personnel who are law enforcement, public safety, medical staff, and child care personnel. Parents working in these fields and whose household income does not exceed 50% of the state’s median income ($32,000 for a family of three) are eligible to receive child care subsidy for at least three months. The state will pay up to the maximum reimbursement rate for each child, but the family may still have to pay a copayment or fee. On May 1, the individuals eligible based on their job category expands to food and grocery store personnel, food and grocery manufacturing, farming and food production or processing, and food and grocery transit, distribution, and delivery, as well as restaurant workers. The state estimates this will use around $3 million of their CARES Act funding.

Also on May 1, all child care providers are able to apply for Short Term Assistance Benefit for Licensed Entities, or STABLE, payments. These payments may be used to cover staff salaries and benefits, including for substitutes, tuition relief for families, lease or mortgage payments, utilities, cleaning supplies, classroom materials or supplies, unreimbursed food, and other supplies required by CDC guidelines. The state anticipates this funding to total $50 million.

After these payments are made, Georgia has said it intends to survey providers to get a better understanding of their needs, in order to establish a plan for spending the rest of their CARES Act allocation.

Idaho

Child Care has been deemed an essential service in Idaho. The state plans to use their supplemental $20 million in CARES Act funds for continuing subsidy payments for providers if they have closed or decreased enrollment (40%), paying direct grants to providers for continued operations if they have closed or decreased enrollment (20%), for child care providers serving frontline and essential workers, and for sanitation, cleaning supplies, and related services or supplies. The grant application for providers will be available on May 1, and these grants are projected to take up at least 75% of their CARES Act funding. Looking ahead, Idaho would like to invest more in disaster preparation and recovery grants, trauma informed community supports, and out of school time programming for children.

Illinois

In Illinois, all licensed child care programs had closed but the state deemed child care essential and created a new emergency license for centers that continue to operate. Homes can operate under license-exempt status for up to six children during the stay at home order. The state received $118.4 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act and state officials estimate they will use funds for increased payment rates for child care providers serving frontline and essential workers (50%), continuing subsidy payments for providers if they have closed or decreased enrollment (35%), paying for child care for essential workers who would not otherwise qualify for subsidy, and sanitation, cleaning supplies, and related services or supplies.

Illinois anticipates funding through CARES to last through June and are aggressively supporting providers in accessing the Paycheck Protection Program and unemployment insurance so the CCDBG funds can last longer. The state is currently cost-modeling about how to further finance child care into the fall and estimate around $400 million per month would be needed to support programs beyond what they might be receiving through PPP.

The state viewed the flexibilities given in CARES as very useful, especially the ability to serve essential workers, and believe that looking ahead, Congress could help by providing funds that can be used in a flexible way to stabilize state and local revenues.

Indiana

Indiana received an additional $78.8 million for CCDBG in the CARES Act. The state is using the additional funds to provide Temporary Assistance Grants to Retain Child Care, designed to replace lost revenues from private-pay children during COVID-19. Grants are intended to assist providers—both those still open and who have temporarily closed—in continuing to pay staff during this time and to ensure the future viability of these programs. Any provider who is eligible to participate in CCDBG may apply and must reapply every two weeks in order to receive funds.

Over the first month, over 2,000 programs received a total of nearly $20 million through the grants. Of applicants, 55% were home-based family child care providers, 32% were center-based programs, and 13% were faith-based ministries. Additional CARES Act funding will be used to support programs reopen when the crisis begins to pass.

Additional Information

Kansas

Through the CARES Act, Kansas received an additional $30.77 million in CCDBG funds. The state has used this money to create a Hero Relief Program which expands child care subsidies for essential workers, specifically health care workers and first responders, and provides financial support directly to child care providers. The new program specifically targets health care workers, first responders and other essential workers. The state has capped eligibility at 250% of the federal poverty level (or $54,300 for a family of three).

The Hero Relief Program will also support child care providers by providing a variety of financial assistance measures, including grants, to help with continuing operations during the pandemic. The uses of funds may include pay for ongoing expenses such as rent or mortgage, staff salaries, replacement for loss of enrollment, purchasing necessary supplies such as gloves and disinfectants, and other items. The state also is offering a one-time bonus for providers who are staying open to care for children of essential workers during the crisis.

Additional Information

Kentucky

Kentucky ordered licensed, certified, and registered child care programs to close on March 20 until further notice. The state received $67.7 million in supplemental funding through the CARES Act. The state is using funds to offer subsidy payments to providers based on enrollment, rather than attendance, during the crisis, regardless of whether the program is currently open or has temporarily closed. Additionally, the state will cover the cost of parent copays to avoid placing additional financial strain on parents during this time. Kentucky plans to also offer subsidy payments to limited duration child care programs, given that most registered and licensed providers are currently closed, pending a waiver request.

Additional Information

Louisiana

Supplemental CCDBG CARES Act funds for Louisiana totaled $67.6 million. Louisiana plans to allocate these funds to two separate grants to support families and providers both during the crisis and when parents can go back to work and programs can reopen. For each grant, any provider who is certified for the state’s subsidy program, including family home and in-home providers, are eligible to apply. The two grants are as follows.

Emergency Child Care Development Fund Response Grant: This grant is intended for child care providers that have remained open or have reopened during the crisis to offer care for children of frontline and essential workers, and that are incurring additional costs as a result of mitigation requirements and CDC guidance. The state encourages providers to use funds to pay staff salaries and to cover additional costs associated with operating during the pandemic, such as sanitation supplies, and utilities. Providers must have been serving children after March 23, 2020, in order to apply.

Emergency Child Care Relief Grant: This grant will support providers to remain operational after the crisis passes. As with the emergency response grant, a portion of these funds are encouraged to be used to pay the salaries and wages of staff and may be used on other operational costs such as supplies, rent or mortgages, and utilities.

Additional Information

Maine

Maine received $10.9 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act. The state is using its CARES funds to: provide child care subsidy for essential employees who exceed current Child Care Subsidy Program (CCSP) income guidelines through June, or two weeks after the end of the civil emergency, whichever is soonest. For these subsidies, payments will be paid directly to providers of a parent’s choosing. Additionally, the state is providing a one-time stipend to all licensed child care providers and all license-exempt non-relative providers participating in CCSP, with varying amounts based on their status (opened or closed), and their capacity. Providers who are closed will receive $75 per licensed slot, while those that remain open will receive $175 per licensed slot.

Further, the state provide grants to aid child care providers in resuming operations following the civil emergency. The details of the grant process is forthcoming.

Maryland

Maryland considers child care as an essential service and has obligated 100% of their CCDBG funding provided in the CARES Act. Maryland has obligated these funds for paying for child care for essential workers (75%) and increasing the payment rates for child care providers who are open and serving frontline and essential workers (25%). Maryland already uses CCDBG funds to continue paying subsidy payments to providers if they have decreased enrollment.

Looking ahead, Maryland is very concerned that they will not have enough child care options once this pandemic ends and parents start going back to work. To that end, they would like to do more to support child care, including paying providers who have closed due to concerns about COVID-19 and supporting family child care providers who are not collecting unemployment insurance. Additionally, the state would like to provide grants for programs who have had to spend more money on purchasing supplies to combat the virus, and offer mental health resources to providers, many who have no health insurance.

Maryland believes that in order to continue supporting their existing activities and accomplish these additional goals, they would need an additional $60 million over the next six months. They received $45 million in supplemental funding through the CARES Act.

The state also believes that recovery grants would be extremely useful for child care providers who have had trouble accessing PPP funds and other loans, or are worried about forgiveness mandates. Officials would also like to see specific guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on how child care providers could protect families and children, as well as staff, given the nuances of child care and how it differs from public schools.

Massachusetts

Massachusetts received an additional $45.7 million in CCDBG funding through the CARES Act. The state has temporarily closed all programs, and has authorized emergency child care programs to remain open for vulnerable children and children of working parents who have been identified as essential. Programs remaining open require an emergency authorization in order to operate during the emergency. Small grants will be provided, at a flat rate, to help defray the cost of operations for child care programs staying open under the emergency status. The state is continuing to pay all subsidies and parent copayments to providers who are closed, for the duration of the public health emergency. Massachusetts plans to continue operating emergency child care through June.

Additional Information

Michigan

Michigan received $100.1 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act and announced it will be adding $30 million of CCDBG funding to create a Child Care Relief Fund. The fund will offer grants to child care providers who are open and serving children of essential workers, and cover any parent copayments or fees. Providers must agree to reduce weekly rates for families by 10%. Grants may also be used to cover fixed costs such as mortgages, utilities, insurance, and/or payroll. Centers can apply for a grant of at least $3,000 and home-based providers for at least $1,500, with additional funding based on the size of the provider, whether they are open and serving essential workers, and their quality rating. Applications opened on April 29, and within the first day, the state received applications from 2,200 providers–or a quarter of providers they believe are eligible. Michigan’s goal is to support every provider in the state with a grant.

Additional Information

Montana

Montana received $10.1 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act and anticipates this funding will last through June. The state plans to pay providers for enrollment, rather than attendance, and all parent copayments from March to May for those providers that have remained open. For those that have temporarily closed, but plan to reopen, the state will offer a backpay of three months. Additionally, Montana plans to offer mini-grants to all programs and larger grants to programs that are open and serving in emergency capacity.

Nevada

Child care has been deemed essential in Nevada, but over 70% of programs are closed. The state received $32.9 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act and anticipates this funding will last through August. Nevada plans to primarily use CARES Act funds to relieve child care businesses from some of the economic impacts by awarding grants to support the continuing operations of providers who have closed or decreased enrollment through both direct grants to providers (64%) and continuing subsidy payments (24%). They will also use CARES Act funding to update eligibility systems and match families with open providers.

Nevada has also repurposed $1.2 million fro
m unspent CCDBG quality dollars for emergency stipends to cover unexpected costs resulting from COVID-19. Unfortunately, the CARES Act did not cover the cost to provide funding to all child care providers in Nevada, and the state would need additional federal funding to support the market and allow programs to reopen once the crisis passes. Additionally, Nevada would like funding to offer a pay increase for child care staff, as officials note some providers are having trouble bringing back workers who are receiving the expanded unemployment insurance.

New York

Child care has been deemed essential in New York. New York received $118 million in supplemental CARES Act funding and plans to use $30 million to cover essential staff whose income is less than 300% of the federal poverty level—or $78,600 for a family of four—and will be paid at market rate for each region statewide. Essential workers can use the funding to pay for their existing care arrangement or to find a new care arrangement that is open.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) also announced the CARES funding will be used to purchase supplies for child care providers statewide who remain open, including masks, gloves, diapers, baby wipes, baby formula and food. Child care resource and referral agencies will receive grants totaling approximately $600 per provider and will distribute these supplies to providers.

Additional Information

North Carolina

Child care in North Carolina is an essential service. North Carolina received $118 million in supplemental CCDBG funding through the CARES Act, and the state anticipates the funds will last through July. The state is spending most of their funding from the CARES Act on providing grants to child care providers to continue operations if they have temporarily closed or have decreased enrollment (70%), and for increasing payment rates to providers who are open and caring for children of frontline and essential workers (25%). They are also using funds for cleaning, sanitation, and supplies, and for development of a data system to help parents find open providers.

North Carolina has also repurposed over $60 million from existing CCDBG funding to support child care for essential workers, supporting providers through continued and increased payments, and covering parent copayments for April and May.

North Carolina anticipates needing an additional infusion of $118 million (equal to the amount they received in the CARES Act) to continue these activities over the next six months. The state is very concerned about permanently losing many child care programs that are closed and would like to direct funds to entice providers to reopen and to attract staff and teachers back into the workforce through increased salaries and benefits. The state also believes that many of the flexibilities and strategies provided in the CARES Act would be useful if extended.

Oklahoma

The Oklahoma Department of Human Services announced it will use its $50 million in supplemental funds from the CARES Act to establish a program to help families receive child care as they seek employment. The new funds will allow families seeking employment to receive up to 60 days of child care as they try to reenter the workforce after COVID-19. Families do not have to meet typical eligibility requirements for this new program, and parents can send their children to any child care provider licensed and contracted to accept subsidies, and the money will be allocated directly to those providers.

Additional Information

Oregon

Oregon received $38.6 million in supplemental CCDBG funds through the CARES Act. The state has directed families for whom child care is not necessary to keep their children at