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New CBO Estimate of Effect of Defense Sequester on Outlays Matches Previous BPC Estimate

By Brian Collins

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Last week, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released its first updated estimate of the effect of the sequester on outlays (actual spending) since the March implementation of sequestration. CBO projects that the defense sequester cuts to discretionary outlays will ramp up steeply during Fiscal Years (FY) 2014 and 2015, from a $29 billion cut in FY 2014 to $43 billion in FY 2015. Last October, the Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC) made a virtually identical estimate—that the effect of the defense sequester on outlays would rise from a $30 billion cut in FY 2014 to $45 billion in FY 2015.

CBO also issued estimates for the effect of the non-defense sequester on outlays, projecting that these outlay cuts to discretionary and certain mandatory spending (including Medicare) will increase from $30 billion in FY 2014 to $45 billion in FY 2015.

These estimates provide additional evidence that the largest impacts and greatest economic damage from sequestration are yet to come. The recent budget agreement, if enacted, would delay the worst of this damage for 12 to 18 months, but would not serve as a long-lasting solution.

BPC’s full analysis of the economic and national security consequences of the defense sequester are available in the following reports:

From Merely Stupid to Dangerous: The Sequester’s Effects on National and Economic Security

What is the Impact of the Defense Sequester on the Economy?

2013-12-18 00:00:00
The recent budget agreement would delay the worst of the damage for 12 to 18 months, but would not serve as a long-lasting solution

 

KEYWORDS: CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE, MEDICARE