Working to find actionable solutions to the nation's key challenges.

The Democracy Project brings together bipartisan and diverse voices to support efforts to improve the ability of government to grapple with the nation’s challenges.

In 2010, the Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC) launched the Democracy Project, bringing together bipartisan and diverse voices to support efforts to improve the ability of government to grapple with the nation’s challenges. The project is guided by an Advisory Committee co-chaired by former Secretary of Agriculture and BPC Senior Fellow Dan Glickman, former Secretary of the Interior and Governor from Idaho Dirk Kempthorne and AOL co-founder Steve Case. The co-chairs all share similar concerns about the lack of civil discourse in the current political environment, and the rules and structures that inhibit shared progress. The advisory committee includes some of the nation’s top government, civic, business, military and academic leaders to guide its work.

Overview
Our nation is at risk. Our political system is wracked with polarization and often with inaction on large public policy problems. The Democracy Project seeks to confront this disillusion by identifying and nurturing the leaders and institutions that are willing to work together to solve problems. We seek both institutional and cultural changes to build momentum for transformational change through a series of small discrete victories that demonstrate the potential for more effective government.

Policy Work
The Democracy Project is actively working on many policy streams to strengthen and improve our democratic institutions. Current work examines redistricting processes, the presidential appointments process, congressional reform, including a return to “regular order”, election administration and election recounts, obstacles to public service, leadership, and civility in politics and the media.

On Leadership Series
Leadership of institutions is one of the most significant components of improving our political system. While reforming laws and rules that guide institutions is an important endeavor, leaders shape institutions and make reforms effective. Throughout 2012, the Democracy Project is hosting a series of high-level conversations on leadership. The series kicked off in 2011 with Exelon CEO John Rowe, who drew on his decades of private sector experience in addressing the topic of leadership in business leadership. In January 2012, former Senate Majority Leaders Tom Daschle and Trent Lott discussed leading the Senate in an age of polarized politics. Quarterly events will bring other leaders of our governmental and cultural institutions.