Foreign Policy Project

About the Project

The Foreign Policy Project is committed to developing realistic and robust bipartisan policy recommendations for the principal national security and foreign policy issues confronting the United States.

President Erdoğan?

On August 10, Turks go to the polls in an election widely expected to deliver another electoral victory for Turkey’s strongman, Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan. His election is likely to be the result of a now-typical combination of circumstances: a formidable campaign machine, a weak opposition, a strong economy – but also a widespread use of administrative and financial resources that have tilted Turkey’s electoral playing field, and means that the country’s elections may still be free, but certainly not fair. Erdoğan will view his election as a coronation; as a confirmation that he is now the undisputed leader of Turkey. Few will note that he is technically moving to a less powerful position – and in this sense, the main implication of his move to the presidential palace is likely to be a further de-institutionalization of power in Turkey.

INFOGRAPHIC: Evaluating a Nuclear Deal With Iran

BPC released a new infographic and analysis that shows what would constitute an acceptable nuclear deal with Iran as the Joint Plan of Action (JPA) deadline approaches this weekend. The visual shows various ideas of what a “good” outcome could consist of and the analysis expands on the options.

Iran Nuclear DealIran Nuclear Deal

ISIS v. ISIL

Who’s in Iraq? Why are there various names for the terror group in Iraq?

The terrorist group marching through Iraq and slowly taking control of large swaths of the country has been referred to by a variety of names by our government officials, the media and foreign policy experts. These include the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS), and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). 

The Rise of ISIS Reveals the Middle East’s Shifting Alliances

On June 10, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) seized control of Mosul, Iraq’s second largest city, as well as Tikrit, and is now steadily advancing towards Baghdad. The ascendancy of this extremist organization—which had been excommunicated from al Qaeda earlier this year—has profound implications for the security and stability of the region. It also exposes just how fractured and unsettled the Middle East is.