Bridge-Builder Breakfast: Beyond Politics: Why Education Shouldn't Be A Partisan Issue

Date: 

Saturday, February 5, 2011

Time: 

8:00 AM to 9:30 AM

Venue: 

The Bipartisan Policy Center

Address: 

1225 Eye St. NW
Suite 1000
Washington
DC
20005

Attached files:

UPDATE: Read a blog post recapping the event here.

At a time of increasingly partisan gridlock, where can educators, administrators and policymakers find agreement to better serve the nation's schools and students?

From teacher quality to standardized testing, from charter schools to a national curriculum, the debate about education reform is ongoing. The Bipartisan Policy Center brought together local, state and national education leaders for a candid discussion on the current policy and political landscape effecting reforms across the country.

A series presented by the Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC), Bridge-Builder Breakfasts highlight institutions and individuals who are reaching across political lines to solve critical challenges facing the country. At a time when partisan conflicts often attract the most attention, the BPC is committed to creating a forum for those who, despite differing views, are willing to collaborate in order to advance the common good.

WHO:

Secretary Margaret Spellings

Former United States Secretary of Education

Secretary Ron Tomalis

Pennsylvania Secretary of Education

Dr. Jerry Weast

Superintendent, Montgomery County Public Schools

Segun Eubanks

Director of Teacher Quality, National Education Association

Andrew Rotherham (Moderator)

Partner, Bellwether Education Columnist, Time.com

WHAT:

With the recent focus on America's growing national debt, the debate over what, if any, additional investments should be made to improve the country's education system is moving to the forefront. Local, state and national education leaders discussed the federal political landscape, including the reauthorization of No Child Left Behind legislation, successful reforms at the state and local level and the impact growing budget cuts on the classroom.