BPC Blog

Mixed-Use Neighborhoods May Be Safer, Too

By Emily Badger

The Atlantic

"Neighborhoods with a mix of residences, offices and retail outlets are now conventionally thought to have a host of benefits, a departure in thinking from the years of urban planning when cities sought to segregate uses of land, with the houses in one corner of town and the shopping district in another. Mixed-use neighborhoods enable people to walk more, with downstream health benefits. They help cut down on traffic congestion, and therefore pollution. For many people, they create livelier communities and a higher quality of life." Read more here.

Widespread Divisions Constrain Actions of Political Elites

By Alan Abramowitz

The debate over polarization in American politics comes down to one fundamental question: Is polarization limited to those who comprise what Morris Fiorina of Stanford University has referred to as the political class—elected officials and a small set of activists—or is it evident among a large segment of the American public? The answer, in my view, is that polarization is now evident among a very large segment of the American public.

In case you missed it, here's what they've been saying about BPC this week


 

Catalia Camia in USA Today:

Bipartisanship is now the name of the game on immigration, with power politicos Condoleezza Rice, Henry Cisneros, Haley Barbour and Ed Rendell adding their firepower to overhaul efforts.

Rice and Cisneros -- veterans of the George W. Bush and Clinton White Houses, respectively — will co-chair a new bipartisan task force that will offer recommendations to Congress on how to revamp the nation's immigration laws. They'll be joined in the group's leadership by two ex-governors — Barbour, R-Miss., and Rendell, D-Pa.

Throughout the week, the BPC Housing Commission highlights news items that address critical developments in housing policy. Any views expressed in the content posted on this forum do not necessarily represent the views of the Commission, its co-chairs or the Bipartisan Policy Center.

What We're Reading posts include a compilation of useful links in the Housing Visualized section below. These resources offer the latest economic indicators, expert insight, and statistical trends related to the U.S. housing market.

Housing Visualized

2010 Census l Mapping the Census l Comparing Recessions and Recoveries

Infographic: Rental Housing Market Trends l Housing by the Numbers

Infographic: Household Formation Gap l Who Gains Most From Tax Breaks

Infographic: Housing's Economic Impact l Measuring Economic Mobility

Past Commissions and Reports l Trulia’s Housing Barometer

Credit Conditions l U.S. Housing Summary l Mortgage Data

Changes in Home Prices l Wells Fargo Monthly Economic Outlook

WF Real Estate & Housing Reports l Prices and Inventory by Metro Area

 


The Devastating Impact of Sequestration on the Poor and Vulnerable

By Nan Roman

Huffington Post

"Sequestration comes at a bad time for those who need help to pay the rent. The federal government just this week reported that 8.5 million extremely poor households pay more than half of their income for rent - a number that has gone up 40 percent since 2007. This is not because they are doing anything wrong, but because there are millions fewer low cost housing units than there are households who need them." Read more here.

Summary

The latest report from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), released on May 22, demonstrates that Iran is continuing a trend first identified in February 2013: slowing down and speeding up elements of its nuclear program to evade red lines set by U.S. and Israeli leaders, while drawing closer to nuclear weapons capability.

Throughout the week, the BPC Housing Commission highlights news items that address critical developments in housing policy. Any views expressed in the content posted on this forum do not necessarily represent the views of the Commission, its co-chairs or the Bipartisan Policy Center. What We're Reading posts include a compilation of useful links in the Housing Visualized section below. These resources offer the latest economic indicators, expert insight, and statistical trends related to the U.S. housing market.

Housing Visualized

2010 Census l Mapping the Census l Comparing Recessions and Recoveries Infographic: Rental Housing Market Trends l Housing by the Numbers Infographic: Household Formation Gap l Who Gains Most From Tax Breaks Infographic: Housing's Economic Impact l Measuring Economic Mobility Past Commissions and Reports l Trulia’s Housing Barometer Credit Conditions l U.S. Housing Summary l Mortgage Data Changes in Home Prices l Wells Fargo Monthly Economic Outlook WF Real Estate & Housing Reports l Prices and Inventory by Metro Area


Housing Market Shows Fastest Rate of Recovery Since Before the Crash By Hari Sreenivasan PBS Newshour "New reports show a spike in U.S. home prices, rising at the fastest pace since 2006. To learn what's driving this recovery, Hari Sreenivasan talks with Nicholas Retsinas of the Harvard Business School." Read more here.

 

Our nation faces increasingly complex challenges, requiring the best and brightest public servants to solve these problems.

Throughout the week, the BPC Housing Commission highlights news items that address critical developments in housing policy. Any views expressed in the content posted on this forum do not necessarily represent the views of the Commission, its co-chairs or the Bipartisan Policy Center.

Americans are digging themselves out of mortgage debt

"Home equity in the first quarter rose to $6.7 trillion, the highest level since 2008, as homeowners taking advantage of record-low borrowing costs to refinance their loans brought cash to the table to pay down principal. The 7.3 percent gain was the biggest jump in more than 60 years, according to Federal Reserve data." Read more here.

In case you missed it, here's what they've been saying about BPC this week


 

Governor Haley Barbour in The Washington Post

“I am very comfortable with a path to citizenship,” Barbour told reporters at a Bipartisan Policy Center briefing. “It should be more strenuous than the path for people who come here under the regular rules.”

 

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